President Biden’s First 100 Days Plan Recommendation For Cybersecurity

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Recommendations for President Biden’s First 100 Days

A White Paper Developed By the United States Of America Cyberspace Solarium Commission

SCARS supports these recommendations and encourages the Biden Administration to enact them fully.

“TRANSITION BOOK FOR THE INCOMING BIDEN ADMINISTRATION”

CSC White Paper #5

JANUARY 2021
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA CYBERSPACE SOLARIUM COMMISSION
CO-CHAIRMEN Senator Angus King (I-Maine), Representative Mike Gallagher (R-Wisconsin)

Within the first 100 days of taking office, the Biden-Harris administration can set in motion three processes that will elevate cybersecurity as an imperative across the government and put the United States on a path toward reducing the probability and impact of cyberattacks against it.

See the full PDF below for more

Priorities:

Early Priorities: First Days

  1. Establish the Office Of the National Cyber Director
  2. Develop and Promulgate a National Cyber Strategy
  3. Improve the Coherence and Impact Of Existing Government Cybersecurity Efforts and Further Strengthen Partnerships with the Private Sector

Priorities for Executive Action beyond 100 Days

  1. Restore American International Cyber Leadership
  2. Invest More in the People We Need to Defend against Malicious Cyberattacks
  3. Invest in the Resiliency Of Our Infrastructure
  4. Safeguard America’s High-Tech Supply Chains
  5. Preserve America’s Military Cyber Advantage
  6. Protect America’s Full Spectrum War Fighting and Deterrence Capabilities from Cyber Threats

A Positive Cyber Legislative Agenda for the Biden-Harris Administration

  1. Build Better Cyber Expertise in Government
  2. Institutionalize International Cyber Engagement
  3. Promote a More Secure National Cyber Ecosystem
  4. Invest in Cyber Resiliency
  5. Create Support for Victims Of Cybercrime
  6. Protect American Democracy

Purpose Of The White Paper

This white paper is intended to provide a guide for the incoming Biden-Harris administration, identifying possible early policy achievements and suæesting priorities for action over the coming months and years. The recommendations contained in this booklet are discussed in more detail in the Commission’s final report and accompanying white papers.

Key Elements of the Recommendation:

1. ESTABLISH THE OFFICE OF THE NATIONAL CYBER DIRECTOR

Numerous commissions, initiatives, and studies have recommended a more robust and institutionalized national-level mechanism for coordinating cybersecurity and associated emerging technology and for overseeing the executive branch’s development and implementation of an integrated national cybersecurity strategy. As emerging technology- and cyberspace-related issues become more complex and consequently become a greater threat to U.S. national security the President’s need for sound advice and timely options will be increasingly critical. To ensure strong, stable, and expert-led cybersecurity leadership in the White House, the Biden-Harris administration should nominate a National Cyber Director, for Senate confirmation, within its first 30 days, and begin building the Office of the National Cyber Director. The FY2021 National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) established the National Cyber Director and the Office of the National Cyber Director.  The National Cyber Director, situated within the Executive Office of the President, is a Senate-confirmed advisor to the President who fills several important including

To ensure strong, stable, and expert-led cybersecurity leadership in the White House, the Biden-Harris administration should nominate a National Cyber Director, for Senate confirmation, within its first 30 days, and begin building the Offce of the National Cyber Director. “Ihe FY2021 National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) established the National Cyber Director and the Office of the National Cyber Director. 4 ‘Ihe National Cyber Director, situated within the Executive Office of the President, is a Senate-confirmed advisor to the President who fills several important including:

  1. Acting as the President’s principal advisor on cybersecurity and associated emerging technology issues;
  2. Leading the development of a National Cyber Strategy and ensuring its implementation across departments and agencies, including reviewing agency budgets and ensuring the effective integration of interagency efforts;
  3. Overseeing and coordinating federal government to defend the United States in the face of adversary cyber operations, including serving as a primary point of contact with the private sector as well as with state, local, tribal, and territorial entities;
  4. and Convening and coordinating Cabinet-level or National Security Council Principals Committee—level meetings and associated preparatory meetings, with concurrence from the National Security Advisor or the National Economic Advisor.

See the full PDF below for more

2. DEVELOP AND PROMULGATE A NATIONAL CYBER STRATEGY

Once the National Cyber Director is in place, the Biden-Harris administration should begin the process of developing and promulgating a new National Cyber Strategy for the United States of America. The 2018 National Cyber Strategy was the first U.S. national cybersecurity strategy issued in nearly 1 5 years and only the second in the nation’s history.

Any effective strategy for cyberspace will require a coordinated effort across the multiple stakeholders within the federal government, state and local governments, and the private sector that are all responsible for securing and defending the United States in this domain. Therefore, the strategy must explicitly align and synchronize stakeholder strategic objectives, identify lines of effort to put the strategy into operation, clarify what priority should be given to various efforts, and articulate common risk. Furthermore, the strategy should integrate the concept of “defend forward,” which currently anchors the Department of Defense’s 2018 Cyber Strategy, into the broader U .S. cyber strategy. The strategy should make defend forward an integral part of a comprehensive approach that encompasses the employment not just of strictly military capabilities but of all instruments of national power: these include economic efforts, law enforcement activities, diplomatic tools, and signals directed to both allies and adversaries.

The new National Cyber Strategy should articulate a framework for successfully disrupting and deterring our adversaries from ever undertaking significant cyberattacks through layered cyber deterrence and should set forth ways and means of (1) shaping adversary behavior, (2) denying adversaries benefits, and (3) imposing costs on adversaries. While deterrence is an enduring American strategy, there are two factors that make layered cyber deterrence bold and distinct. First, the approach prioritizes deterrence by denial, specifically by increasing the defense and security of cyberspace through resilience and public- and private-sector collaboration, reducing the vulnerabilities adversaries can target. Second, the strategy incorporates the concept of “defend forward” discussed above.

See the full PDF below for more

3. IMPROVE THE COHERENCE AND IMPACT OF EXISTING GOVERNMENT CYBERSECURITY EFFORTS AND FURTHER STRENGTHEN PARTNERSHIPS WITH THE PRIVATE SECTOR

While private-sector entities and state, local, tribal, and territorial governments are responsible for the defense and security of their networks, the U.S. government must bring to bear its unique authorities and resources, as well as diplomatic, economic, military, law enforcement, and intelligence capabilities, to support these actors in their defense efforts. In addition, as the SolarWinds incident has shown, federal government departments and agencies must bolster their both to prevent cyber incidents and to identify, detect, and effectively respond to them when they do occur. To improve the ability of the U .S. government both to defend itself in cyberspace and to work collaboratively with private-sector and other key players, the Biden-Harris administration should strengthen the integrated cyber center within the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) and build the Joint Cyber Planning Office.

  1. Review Federal Agency Cybersecurity Budgets for FY 2022 Appropriations
  2. Strengthen an Integrated Cyber Center within CISA
  3. Create a Joint Cyber Planning Office within CISA
  4. Set Expectations and Responsibilities for Sector Risk Management Agencies

See the full PDF below for more

PRIORITIES FOR EXECUTIVE ACTION BEYOND 100 DAYS

With leadership and coordination structures established in the White House and a national cybersecurity strategy set in w place in the first 100 days, seven key priorities should shape the focus of the Biden-Harris administration on cybersecurity over the remainder of its term.

  1. RESTORE AMERICAN INTERNATIONAL CYBER LEADERSHIP
    1. Establish the Bureau of Cyberspace Policy and Emerging Technologies
    2. Expand U.S. Government Support for Capacity Building, Norms, and Confidence-Building Measures
    3. Engage More Actively and Effectively in International ICT Standards Forums
  2. INVEST MORE IN THE PEOPLE WE NEED TO DEFEND AGAINST MALICIOUS CYBERATTACKS
    1. Establish Workforce Leadership and Coordination Structures
    2. Ensure Availability of Special Hiring Authorities and Pay Flexibilities for Cyber across the U.S. Government
    3. Expand the CyberCorps Scholarship for Service Program
  3. INVEST IN THE RESILIENCY OF OUR INFRASTRUCTURE
    1. Begin Continuity of the Economy Planning
    2. Explore the Viability of Sharing Information at Machine Speed
    3. Improve Intelligence Support to the Private Sector
  4. SAFEGUARD AMERICA’S HIGH-TECH SUPPLY CHAINS
    1. Develop and Promulgate an ICT Industrial Base Strategy
  5. PRESERVE AMERICA’S MILITARY CYBER ADVANTAGE
    1. Conduct a Force Structure Assessment of the Cyber Mission Force
    2. Create Major Force Program for Cyber Command
    3. Update the Rules of Engagement and Guidance for the Use of Force for Cyber
    4. Assess the Establishment of a Military Cyber Reserve
    5. Review the Defend Forward Concept and the Delegation of Authorities for Offensive Cyber Operations
  6. PROTECT AMERICA’S FULL SPECTRUM WAR FIGHTING AND DETERRENCE CAPABILITIES FROM CYBER THREATS

See the full PDF below for more

A POSITIVE CYBER LEGISLATIVE AGENDA FOR THE BIDEN-HARRIS ADMINISTRATION

By drawing on existing authorities and appropriations, the executive branch can make great progress in rebuilding America’s cybersecurity, but some CSC recommendations cannot be implemented without congressional support and approval. The Biden-Harris administration should work with Congress to ensure that the United States is best positioned to prevent, withstand, respond to, and ultimately recover from significant cyber incidents. A positive cybersecurity legislative agenda for the administration should focus on building better cyber expertise in government, institutionalizing international cyber engagement, promoting a more secure national cyber ecosystem, investing in cyber IUiliency, creating support for victims of cybercrime, and protecting American democracy.

See the full PDF below for more

1. BUILD BETTER CYBER EXPERTISE IN GOVERNMENT

Both the executive and legislative of the federal government would benefit from greater cyber policy expertise and more robust metrics and data to help drive cyber policy. The Biden-Harris administration should work with Congress to implement two recommendations from the CSC final report that are aimed at building this capacity: (1) a Bureau of Cyber Statistics within the executive branch and (2) codifying and strengthening the Cyber Threat Intelligence Integration Center.

  1. Establish the Bureau of Cyber Statistic
  2. Codify and Strengthen the Cyber Threat Intelligence Integration Center

See the full PDF below for more

2. INSTITUTIONALIZE INTERNATIONAL CYBER ENGAGEMENT

While the Biden-Harris administration can take some steps to reprioritize international cyber engagement through the Department of State, to meaningfully elevate and institutionalize international cyber engagement it must create a new bureau and an associated Ambassador-at-Large for Cyberspace Policy and Emerging Technology with a rank equivalent to Assistant Secretary. In the same vein, Part II of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 should be changed to provide more effective structural support to critical cybersecurity capacity-building programs worldwide.

  1. Codify a Bureau for Cyberspace Policy at the State Department
  2. Maximize Flexibility in International Cybersecurity Capacity Building

See the full PDF below for more

3. PROMOTE A MORE SECURE NATIONAL CYBER ECOSYSTEM

Today, the cyber ecosystem is more than the technology information, network, and operational technology that constitutes the internet. It is also the people, processes, and organizations that plug into the technology and the data that they combine to produce. This ecosystem has increased the speed of our communications, as well as efficiency, functionality, and growth in the economy. But though this ecosystem is central to the functioning of the nation, it has also introduced significant and opened up potential harms across the United Adversaries leverage its vulnerabilities and its expansive reach into our society to gain an asymmetric advantage, developing capabilities to hold our critical infrastructure at risk, disrupt our elections, and spy on and target the data, systems, and resilience of the American people. The Biden-Harris administration should take steps to lessen vulnerability across the ecosystem by shifting the burden of security away from end-users to owners and operators, developers, and manufacturers who can more effectively implement security solutions at the appropriate scale.

  1. Create a National Cybersecurity Certification and Labeling Authority
  2. Pass an Internet of Things Security Law
  3. Create an IT Modernization Grant Program for State, Local, Tribal, and Territorial Governments
  4. Clarify the Legal Liability of Final Goods Assemblers of Hardware, Software, and Firmware
  5. Pass a National Data Breach Notification Law

See the full PDF below for more

4. INVEST IN CYBER RESILIENCY

The U.S. government should increase its support of private-sector cyber defensive operations. Given its limited resources and capabilities, however, the federal government should prioritize the defense of systemically important critical infrastructure—the critical infrastructure that manages systems and assets whose disruption could have cascading, destabilizing effects on U.S. national security, economic security, or public health and safety.

  1. Codify Systemically Important Critical Infrastructure in Law
  2. Establish a National Risk Management Cycle

See the full PDF below for more

 

5. CREATE SUPPORT FOR VICTIMS OF CYBERCRIME

The uptick in fraud and other malicious activity during the COVID-19 pandemic has provided an unwelcome reminder that major emergencies present for criminals to further stress overburdened public services and the American people. The Biden-Harris administration should work with Congress to create institutions that would provide relevant support to victims of cybercrime by creating a National Cybercrbne Victim Assistance and Recovery Center, as well as a grant program to fund nonprofits that aid victims of cyber crime.

See the full PDF below for more

6. PROTECT AMERICAN DEMOCRACY

  1. Enhance and Improve the Structure of the Election Assistance Commission
  2. Promote Digital Literacy, Civics Education, and Public Awareness

See the full PDF below for more

United States Of America Cyberspace Solarium Commission

Full Text Of The White Paper

Download the PDF file .

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